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20110701
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Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
allow it to happen? our report tonight from our senior investigative correspondent, lisa myers. >> reporter: bev arnold was shocked to find almost $300 in mysterious charges buried on her phone bills. one for her very own 800 number. >> i laughed because it was an 800 number, but then i was furious. >> reporter: the bogus charges were from companies she had never even heard of. >> it's called cramming, but it's really scamming. >> reporter: today at a hearing, senator j. rockefeller said that millions of americans have already been victimized, with phone companies profiting from the scheme. how do the phone companies make money on this practice? >> every time something shows up of a cramming nature on one of their bills, they will make $1 or $2. >> reporter: we went to florida to track down some of the companies suspected of cramming. their corporate headquarters, seemingly only a post office box. we also visited the firm that represents many of these companies named dedata. they say customers are only charged for items they authorize we found the company in this unmarked build
coins still make sense. nbc's chief investigative correspondent lisa myers explains. >> reporter: for almost four years, the mint has been churning out one dollar coins bearing the image of presidents. more than 2 billion coins minted so far. honoring 18 presidents. george washington through grant. the coins haven't exactly caught fire with the public. >> how often do you use dollar coins? >> never. >> nobody's ever heard of them. >> you can't really put them in things like vending machines. >> reporter: there's so little interest in these coins that some have ended up here. at the federal reserve's coin ba vault in baltimore. in all more than a million dollars in coins are sitting in vaults around the country. row after row after row. the cost to taxpayers? about $300 million so far. 32 cents to make each unwanted coin. plus $650,000 for a new vault for the fed to store them. that from a program which congress had claimed would save money by replacing paper dollar bills with sturdier coins. former congressman earl palmerwas one of the sponsors of the legislation. in retrospect w
is costing customers billions of dollars each year, and our investigative correspondent lisa myers has more for us. >> reporter: barbara arnold was shocked to find $300 in mysterious charges buried on her phone bills and one for her very own 800-number. >> i laughed, because i thought an 800 number, but then i was furious. >> reporter: the bogus charges were from companies she had never heard of. >> it is called cramming, but it is really scamming. >> reporter: senator jay rockefeller said that millions of americans have been victimized and that phone companies actually profit from the scheme. how do the phone companies make money off of the practice? >> every time something shows up which is of a cramming nature on one of their bills, they will make one or two dollars. >> reporter: we went to florida to track down system of the companies suspected of cramming. their corporate headquarters, seemingly only a post office box. we also visited the firm that represents many of the companies named dadata which says that the consumers are charged only for services that they authorize and we found
torrent lisa myers. >> reporter: bev arnold was shot to find almost $300 buried on her phone bill. the bogus charges were from companies she had never even hard of. today at a hearing, senator j. rockefeller said that thousands of americans have already been victimized. >> when something shows up of a cramming nature on one of their bills, they will make one or two dollars. >> reporter: we went to florida to track down some of the companies suspected of cramming. their correspondent headquarters, seemingly only a post office box. we also visited the firm that represents many of these companies, named de data, and c they say customers are only charged for items they authorize we were in your neighborhood and wanted to give you another chance to talk to us. >> reporter: phone companies have gotten hundreds of thousands of complaints, so why do they still give companies access to their kpus her? >> th >> reporter: senate investigators say that since 2006, verizon, at&t and qwest are -- >> there has been improvement, but it remains a very significant, very per sive problem. >> verizon
, there is a great lisa myers piece that has all of the retiring senators from 1996, alan simpson is one of them in there talking about how, oh, the partisanship of this new washington, this is washington circa 1996, which is too much to take and can't believe it. >> you know, it's certainly the chase we had knocked down, drag out fights all along. frankly, a lot of the problems started around the 1994 elections. newt gingrich used an approach that worked. took him 16 years to get there, that was, we have to destroy this institution to save it, to bring in a majority. we've had close partisan margins since pt the permanent campaign takes over. so all of those problems back then have been exacerbated until now. but you can go back then and we found solutions to the immigration problem, with ron masoli, a democrat joining. plenty of partisanship. simpson himself said, said i would never come back now. we used to sit down and say, what can we do to help the country jt now it's what can we do to screw the other guys? >> a lot of chatter about a third way, third parties independent run. all of it fol
lisa myers joins us now with details. lisa, good morning. >> good morning to you, ann. the practice is known as cramming. they bury charges on your home phone bills for services you didn't even know about. it's been a national epidemic for more than a decade. so why do the phone companies still allow it to happen? a new report sends investigators say it comes down to money. lots and lots of money. for millions of consumers the charges are a mystery. she discovered she was being billed $14.95 a month for something called voice mail id theft. >> i don't know what that is. i never asked for it. i never received it. >> reporter: his phone bill, over $16 a month for ycp network fax service. >> to me it's just flat out fraud. >> reporter: she was shocked to find almost $40 in extra charges for vase moil and her very own 800 number. >> first i laughed because i thought, you know, 800 number, but then i was furious. >> reporter: furious because in every case the charges came from third-party companies they had never heard of. it's called cramming. a billion dollar scheme targeting everyone
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)

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